DonorBridge for the International Museum of Cultures

NORTH TEXAS GIVING DAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

International Museum of Cultures is participating in the Donor Bridge North Texas Giving Day.Donor Bridge

September 19, 2013, the North Texas Giving Day, is a day when nonprofits with an approved DonorBridge profile are eligible to receive matching funds when donations are made online through DonorBridge.com.

Mark your calendars for the North Texas Giving Day, which will be held from 7 a.m. to midnight on September 19, 2013.

DonorBridge is run by Communities Foundation of Texas (CFT), with the support of the Center for Nonprofit Management.

Interns Learn the Value of a Museum in the Educational Process

These are such exciting days at the International Museum of Cultures. Everything is abuzz with interns from TCU and OCU, as well as a graduate from Iowa State. We also have high school students earning their Community Service hours, a graduation requirement for certain High School students here in Texas.

What is exciting about having these young interns is that they will experience, first hand, the value that a museum brings to the education process. As is stated in The Foundation’s post on Why Museums are Important, “Museums provide a unique interactive experience of getting up close to things we usually only see in books, newspapers or on the television.” These interns will see how incredibly important it is for young people to see and touch artifacts from different cultures that they have only been able to read about.International Museum of Cultures Music Discovery Box

Bring the Museum to the Student

The International Museum of Cultures is able to bring those artifacts right to the student anywhere in the Continental United States so that the student can have a personal experience with tools, clothes, and instruments from far away lands. The student is then better able to understand different cultures without pre-judgement when encountered by a person of an unfamiliar culture.

These artifacts are shipped to the educational facility with a complete curriculum that fits into any Project Based Learning initiative.

The shipped artifacts to the educational facility is called a Discovery Box. Discovery Boxes allow students to experience cultures around the world in a unique and interactive way. Discovery boxes come in 12 different themes and include a variety of genuine artifacts from the museum’s collection with a complete curriculum for the teacher. Students are be able to touch and examine the artifacts while completing activities and worksheets that encourage them to think critically about the world around them using Project Based Learning (PBL) methods.

Boxes include:

  • a teacher’s guide with detailed object descriptions
  • curricula covering TEKS for K-12 science, social studies, English language arts, fine arts, and math
  • eye-opening activities that guide your students through understanding the objects

Learn More about Discovery Boxes

If you would like to learn more about the Discovery Boxes from the International Museum of Cultures, please contact the Museum at (972) 572-0462

As Education Transforms in the United States, Museums Play a Larger Role

Elaine Gurian wrote a paper about the opportunities for museums to deliver educational services that are more substantial and more central than is currently the norm. In this paper called  Opportunity for Museums in Light of Elementary and Secondary School Reform in the United States, Ms. Gurian states;

Museums, I hope, will capitalize on all these avenues of possible instruction methodologies and offer multiple content selections delivered through diverse methods and thereby become approved variants on classroom instruction in every town where they exist.

The International Museum of Cultures (IMC) agrees that museums should take a larger role in education. The IMC has embraced technology and delivers electronic field trips directly to the classroom using the Internet. The IMC also provides hands-on projects where the children can touch and interact with the museum’s artifacts right in their own classroom.

Electronic Field Trip

The Electronic Field Trip is entirely online and is designed as an interactive learning tool.

  • A series of videos delivered over the Web that provide an entertaining tour of different sections of the museum. The tour focuses on the Peoples of Africa, South America, Papua New Guinea, Asia, and Mexico
  • Curricula covering TEKS for K-12 science, social studies, English language arts, and math.

Discovery Boxes

Discovery Boxes allow students to experience cultures around the world in a unique and interactive way. Discovery boxes come in 12 different themes and include a variety of genuine artifacts from our museum’s collection. Students will be able to touch and examine the artifacts while completing activities and worksheets that encourage them to think critically about the world around them using Project Based Learning (PBL) methods.

Boxes include:

  • a teacher’s guide with detailed object descriptions
  • curricula covering TEKS for K-12 science, social studies, English language arts, fine arts, and math
  • eye-opening activities that guide your students through understanding the objects

For more information on the educational tools from the International Museum of Cultures, call 972 572-0462

How Native Australians Make a Didgeridoo

The Didgeridoo (Yirdaki)

The didgeridoo is thought to be one of the oldest instruments in the world, its usage dating back tens of thousands of years. The instrument itself is at the core of the historical, ceremonial, and cultural practices of the groups that use it.

Didgeridoo from the International Museum of Cultures

Although the didgeridoo has become a symbol of Australia Aboriginal culture throughout the world, it was originally only used by a few groups in the northeast part of Australia.

Some also call a Didgeridoo a Yirdaki. According to didjeridu.com,“the yirdaki is merely a type of didjeridu, a form that is used by the Yolngu people of north-east Arnhem Land. The yirdaki is quite different to other types of didjeridu because of its particular acoustic properties, though this in itself shows variance according to regional preferences and prescribed law among Yolngu clan groups.”

Its low, droning sound is thought to connect individuals with nature and the spirits of “Dreamtime,” or a time of the past when deities were involved in human affairs. Teachers also use the didgeridoo to imitate nature and animal sounds while teaching children about the world around them. Today, didgeridoos have gained worldwide appeal, but many feel like this is at the expense of their traditional sacredness. This didgeridoo, like the majority in the market today, has been produced for commercial purposes but is modeled after traditional designs.
   

Making a Didgeridoo by a Native Australian

To make these instruments the native Australians find a Eucalyptus which is partially hollowed out by termites. They remove a piece of bark and tap the tree to judge the sound before they begin cutting at the base of the tree. Once the tree is cut, and if the hollow inside it is the right dimension, the maker will then cut a 4-6 ft. long section of the tree. To ensure the wood does not crack, the log is cured, either by soaking in water for days or weeks, or by allowing it to completely dry out. All the bark is then stripped from the wood, and if necessary the walls are carved down to reduce the thickness, and sometimes the hollow of the log is better cleaned out as well. After this is complete, a mouthpiece is formed from beeswax, and the instrument is decorated, either with specific patterns for ceremonial use, or to the makers liking if for personal use.

You can learn more at the International Museum of Cultures  a unique anthropology museum. The museum is located in southwest Dallas County. However, the museum also provides transportable artifacts (Discovery Boxes) and an Electronic Field Trip for education on indigenous cultures from around the world.

DonorBridge North Texas Giving Day for the International Museum of Cultures

NORTH TEXAS GIVING DAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012

International Museum of Cultures is participating in the Donor Bridge North Texas Giving Day.Donor Bridge

September 13, 2012, the North Texas Giving Day, is a day when nonprofits with an approved DonorBridge profile are eligible to receive matching funds when donations are made online through DonorBridge.com.

Mark your calendars for the 4th annual North Texas Giving Day, which will be held from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Thursday, September 13, 2012.

All credit card donations of $25 or more made online through DonorBridge will be eligible for matching money, making money received on North Texas Giving Day go even farther in supporting our community.

Check out the Donor Bridge profile for the International Museum of Cultures.

DonorBridge is run by Communities Foundation of Texas (CFT), with the support of The Dallas Foundation and the Center for Nonprofit Management.

March 15th is Philanthropy Day – International Museum of Cultures

Gifts made to the International Museum of Cultures makes this unique anthropology museum possible.

 

Gifts make up approximately 42% of the Museum’s budget. The remainder of our budget is derived from memberships, tour income, and fund raising activities such as events and foundation grants.

 

Join us on March 15th, Philanthropy Day, with a special gift to the International Museum of Cultures.

 

Call us at 972-708-7406 to make your donation by phone or use the Online Donate button below.

Thank you for your donation!

The IMC SELECTED TO PARTICIPATE IN NATIONAL MUSEUM ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

Press Release

Museum of International Cultures, Dallas, Texas

October 28, 2011

INTERNATIONAL MUSEUM OF CULTURES SELECTED TO PARTICIPATE IN NATIONAL MUSEUM ASSESSMENT PROGRAM 

The International Museum of Cultures has been selected to participate in the Museum Assessment Program (MAP).  Through guided self-study and on-site consultation with a museum professional, participation in MAP will empower the International Museum of Cultures to better serve the citizens of Dallas and the greater Metroplex by facilitating its meeting and exceeding the highest professional standards of the museum field.

The program is funded by the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and throughout its 30 years has been administered by the American Association of Museums (AAM).  As part of the IMLS National Leadership program, MAP advances best practices and fosters improvement in museums.  MAP is a self-motivated program, application to and participation in MAP is initiated by each local institution and those accepted invest considerable human and institutional resources into the assessment.

The International Museum of Cultures is specifically focusing on community involvement and outreach.  As a part of this major effort a virtual tour has been developed and the Electronic Field Trip is available on line after November 15, 2011.

MAP is a confidential process of self-study, peer review and implementation.  Museums use the assessment process to strengthen operations, build capacity and enhance communication throughout the organization and in response to community needs.  Participant museums choose one of three categories for its assessment:  Collections Stewardship, Organizational and Community Engagement.

The International Museum of Cultures is entering its 32nd year of operation.  It is located at 7500 W. Camp Wisdom, Dallas, TX 75236.  Hours of operations are Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Further information may be found on the website: www.internationalmueumofcultures.org or by becoming a fan of the museum’s facebook.

FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
Mary Fae Kamm, Director
972 708 7537
972 708 7341 (fax)
Email:  mfkamm@internationalmuseumofcultures.org