Learn About the People of Mexico at the Museum or Through a Virtual Tour from Your Own School

The International Museum of Cultures (IMC) explores the diversity of languages in Mexico.

The IMC has an exhibit that provides an overview of the richness and diversity of languages in Mexico. It highlights samples of the more than 150 native languages still spoken there. The exhibit additionally focuses on some social implications of this diversity of languages within the national life of Mexico.

Electronic Field Trip at the International Museum of Cultures

If you have students that are interested but not able to visit the museum in person, there is another alternative. The IMC also provides insight into Mexico in its Electronic Field Trip. In the IMC Electronic Field Trip, a Museum Docent of Mexican heritage explains to  students that are touring the museum the tonal importance of these languages. Below is a sample of the dialogue in the Museum’s Virtual Tour:

DOCENT: “You can see that most of the non-Spanish speakers live in the southern part of Mexico. Some of the languages are tonal which means that the only difference between “I’m going, and I’m not going” may be the tone of your voice. Likewise, some are also nasal, and you must say a vowel through your nose. If you don’t, you might say “chili pepper”, like I did when you really wanted to say “horse’s tail”!”
STUDENT: “That could be a problem if you were trying to make chili and put a horse’s tail in the pot.”
DOCENT: “You’re right. Languages, to some extent, are partially a result of need. Mixtec dialects can have as many as 20 different words for corn, like the Eskimos have many words for snow: soft snow, slushy snow, icy snow, etc. The Tzeltales in the state of Chiapas have 25 verbs for “carry”, depending on HOW you are going to carry something: on your back, over your shoulder, in a pocket, in your hand, etc. “

View the promotional video of the eField Trip that visits Mexico, South America, Africa, and Papua New Guinea. Learn more by visiting International Museum of Cultures or call us at (972) 572-0462.

Museums Teach Through Stories

Mary Catherine Bateson is an American writer and cultural anthropologist. She is known for making the statement that “The human species thinks in metaphors and learns through stories.”

When a person attends a museum, they learn through stories. When a student visits a museum, that student hears and even experiences the story of people from far away lands. Museums have a great deal to offer the educational process in America. Within museums, there is a tide change from the traditional passive contemplation role that was very popular through the majority of the last century and the modern role of the museum to be an active participant in community and education. Museums are recognizing the value they can offer education and are reaching out to the community.

As is stated in The Foundation’s post on Why Museums are Important, “Museums provide a unique interactive experience of getting up close to things we usually only see in books, newspapers or on the television.” 

The International Museum of Cultures is able to bring the stories through artifacts right to the student anywhere in the Continental United States so that the student can have a personal experience with tools, clothes, and instruments from far away lands. The student is then better able to understand different cultures without pre-judgement when encountered by a person of an unfamiliar culture.

These artifacts can be shipped to the educational facility with a complete curriculum that fits into any Project Based Learning initiative. The shipped artifacts to the educational facility is called a Discovery Box. Discovery Boxes allow students to experience cultures around the world in a unique and interactive way.

Artifact Discovery box

Artifact Discovery box

Discovery Boxes

Discovery boxes come in 12 different themes and include a variety of genuine artifacts from the museum’s collection. Students are able to touch and examine the artifacts while completing activities and worksheets that encourage them to think critically about the world around them using Project Based Learning (PBL) methods.

For more information about Discovery Boxes from the International Museum of Cultures, please call us at 972 572-0462 or email us at info@internationalmuseumofcultures.org

The IMC Introduces a Business Class Membership

The International Museum of Cultures (IMC) is a unique cultural anthropology museum that features and provides education on contemporary peoples from around the world. We rely on good friends becoming members of the IMC to help foster greater understanding, appreciation and respect between peoples of differing cultures through exhibitions, events, and educational tools.

We have received tremendous support from the business community.  To recognize that support, in 2013 we introduced a Business Class membership as an addition to the IMC regular membership.International Museum of Cultures

A Business Class provides membership cards for up to ten of your employees.  They may visit the museum at anytime during hours of operation using these membership cards.  Additionally, your business may use the Community Room (seats 75) for three events or company meetings during the year.  The Conference Room is equipped with video technology and available via reservation for your use.

A BUSINESS CLASS membership is only $250.00. Providing the following benefits:

  • A certificate of membership
  • Your business name will be listed on the poster displayed in the lobby
  • Your business name listed on other promotional pieces throughout the year.
  • Admits  you and employee card holders to FREE admission to over 700 museums across America.

We hope you will view this invitation as an opportunity to be involved in the arts and culture programs that act as a window into diverse cultures within our communities and throughout the world.

Please contact us for more information at (972) 572-0462. (For information on other Membership opportunities at the International Museum of Cultures, please visit us at InternationalMuseumOfCultures.org)

The Value Cultural Anthropology Brings to Our Educational System

Ngbaka People educatingWhat is Anthropology?

Anthropology is the study of humankind. Anthropologists can be found in a number of settings, such as hospitals, schools, national parks, and even studying our oceans.

The International Museum of Cultures is a cultural anthropology museum. We focus on the ways in which people live around the world. Culture involves the beliefs , attitudes, knowledge and social structure of a group of people. The study of culture can include food, clothing, language, celebrations, education, and religion.

Due to the rapid globalization and imperialism, many people whose ancestors have lived in a location for thousands of years have historically been oppressed. However, indigenous groups hold rich histories and traditions that are very interesting and diverse. Our museum’s goal is to shed light onto the many different ways that indigenous people live around the world in and effort to learn from them and positively represent them.

As our world becomes more unified Globally, it is imperative that we understand various worldviews rather than forcing our worldviews on others. Because of this global context, our goal as a museum is to foster cross-cultural interest, openness and appreciation of cultural diversity.

Understanding and appreciating indigenous cultures from around the world allow us to better appreciate the diversity within our own country, State, and community. This is exceptionally important for young people developing their world views on their way to adulthood.

What are the Benefits of Cultural Anthropology to our Educational System?

The International Museum of Cultures wants to open the mind of the student to other ways of living; to other cultures. Although the museum highlights people that live outside the United States, the diversity of the world is parallel to the diversity we see within our own country and communities. Our museum aims to teach children and adults alike that no way of living is any better than another. We want to foster an appreciation of the diversity of the world.International Museum of Cultures Music Discovery Box

Discovery Boxes

We provide educational tools, such as PBL Discovery Boxes that allow students to experience cultures around the world in a unique and interactive way. Discovery boxes come in 12 different themes and include a variety of genuine artifacts from the museum’s collection. Students are able to touch and examine the artifacts while completing activities and worksheets that encourage them to think critically about the world around them using Project Based Learning (PBL) methods.

Electronic Field Trip

The Electronic Field Trip is entirely online and is designed as an interactive learning tool. The eField Trip is a series of videos delivered over the Web that provide an entertaining tour of different sections of the museum. The tour focuses on the Peoples of Africa, South America, Papua New Guinea, Asia, and Mexico.

Understanding diverse cultures from around the world help us all to better understand our own community. Cultural Anthropology can provide the way to that understanding.

For more information on the educational tools from the International Museum of Cultures, call (972) 572-0462.

Interns Learn the Value of a Museum in the Educational Process

These are such exciting days at the International Museum of Cultures. Everything is abuzz with interns from TCU and OCU, as well as a graduate from Iowa State. We also have high school students earning their Community Service hours, a graduation requirement for certain High School students here in Texas.

What is exciting about having these young interns is that they will experience, first hand, the value that a museum brings to the education process. As is stated in The Foundation’s post on Why Museums are Important, “Museums provide a unique interactive experience of getting up close to things we usually only see in books, newspapers or on the television.” These interns will see how incredibly important it is for young people to see and touch artifacts from different cultures that they have only been able to read about.International Museum of Cultures Music Discovery Box

Bring the Museum to the Student

The International Museum of Cultures is able to bring those artifacts right to the student anywhere in the Continental United States so that the student can have a personal experience with tools, clothes, and instruments from far away lands. The student is then better able to understand different cultures without pre-judgement when encountered by a person of an unfamiliar culture.

These artifacts are shipped to the educational facility with a complete curriculum that fits into any Project Based Learning initiative.

The shipped artifacts to the educational facility is called a Discovery Box. Discovery Boxes allow students to experience cultures around the world in a unique and interactive way. Discovery boxes come in 12 different themes and include a variety of genuine artifacts from the museum’s collection with a complete curriculum for the teacher. Students are be able to touch and examine the artifacts while completing activities and worksheets that encourage them to think critically about the world around them using Project Based Learning (PBL) methods.

Boxes include:

  • a teacher’s guide with detailed object descriptions
  • curricula covering TEKS for K-12 science, social studies, English language arts, fine arts, and math
  • eye-opening activities that guide your students through understanding the objects

Learn More about Discovery Boxes

If you would like to learn more about the Discovery Boxes from the International Museum of Cultures, please contact the Museum at (972) 572-0462

Why is Learning Through a Museum So Effective

We are reminded in the blog post called Memory and Storytelling, of an Indian proverb from a “stories-told” book, The Right Words at the RightTime by Marlo Thomas and Friends

“TELL ME A FACT: I’LL LEARN.
TELL ME A TRUTH: I’LL BELIEVE.
BUT TELL ME A STORY: IT WILL LIVE IN MY HEART–FOREVER.”

The artifacts in a museum all hold stories. And those stories are waiting to be released in a thunder within the minds of children that observe and, when possible, touch the artifact. This experiential effect stimulates further creative thinking leading to more questions and more answers.

A great example of an artifact that tells a story is the Talking Drum. The Talking Drum, called a nkul, is a wooden slit drum that reverberates at dawn around and through the trees and houses of the Ewondo people of Mekomba, Cameroon. When we think of drums being used to communicate, we often think of the drum as a musical instrument. Many cultures throughout history also used them to convey a signal. However, some native civilizations use drums as a speech surrogate. A Speech Surrogate replicates the tone and rhythm of oral speech, taking the ability of a drum to communicate to an entirely new level. Its these types of artifacts that take children to places they never imagined. (Refer to our previous post on Talking Drums where we highlight the book, the “People of the Drum of God – Come”.)

The Museum of International Cultures can bring this experiential learning to the classroom. The Student does not even need to travel to the museum. Some examples of the ways the Museum collaborates with educators are:

Discovery Boxes

Discovery Boxes allow students to experience cultures around the world in a unique and interactive way. Discovery boxes come in 12 different themes and include a variety of genuine artifacts from the museum’s collection. Students are be able to touch and examine the artifacts while completing activities and worksheets that encourage them to think critically about the world around them using Project Based Learning (PBL) methods.

Boxes include:

  • a teacher’s guide with detailed object descriptions
  • curricula covering TEKS for K-12 science, social studies, English language arts, fine arts, and math
  • eye-opening activities that guide your students through understanding the objects

Electronic Field Trip

The Electronic Field Trip is entirely online and is designed as an interactive learning tool.

  • A series of videos delivered over the Web that provide an entertaining tour of different sections of the museum. The tour focuses on the Peoples of Africa, South America, Papua New Guinea, Asia, and Mexico
  • Curricula covering TEKS for K-12 science, social studies, English language arts, and math.

For more information on the educational tools from the International Museum of Cultures, call (972) 572-0462.

Cultural Museum Summer Camp for Junior Anthropologists

If you are interested in experiencing other cultures around the world through examining museum artifacts, sampling food, enjoying music and dance, exploring nature, playing games, scavenger hunts and more, then join us at the International Museum of Cultures.

International Museum of Cultures Summer Camp
Returning this year is the fun filled Visual Arts Camp at the museum. Local artists/instructors offer week long journeys into different genres of art and art forms such as mixed media, drawing, painting, watercolor, sculpture and more!!!

Learn more at Junior Anthropology and Visual Arts Camp