Museums Teach Through Stories

Mary Catherine Bateson is an American writer and cultural anthropologist. She is known for making the statement that “The human species thinks in metaphors and learns through stories.”

When a person attends a museum, they learn through stories. When a student visits a museum, that student hears and even experiences the story of people from far away lands. Museums have a great deal to offer the educational process in America. Within museums, there is a tide change from the traditional passive contemplation role that was very popular through the majority of the last century and the modern role of the museum to be an active participant in community and education. Museums are recognizing the value they can offer education and are reaching out to the community.

As is stated in The Foundation’s post on Why Museums are Important, “Museums provide a unique interactive experience of getting up close to things we usually only see in books, newspapers or on the television.” 

The International Museum of Cultures is able to bring the stories through artifacts right to the student anywhere in the Continental United States so that the student can have a personal experience with tools, clothes, and instruments from far away lands. The student is then better able to understand different cultures without pre-judgement when encountered by a person of an unfamiliar culture.

These artifacts can be shipped to the educational facility with a complete curriculum that fits into any Project Based Learning initiative. The shipped artifacts to the educational facility is called a Discovery Box. Discovery Boxes allow students to experience cultures around the world in a unique and interactive way.

Artifact Discovery box

Artifact Discovery box

Discovery Boxes

Discovery boxes come in 12 different themes and include a variety of genuine artifacts from the museum’s collection. Students are able to touch and examine the artifacts while completing activities and worksheets that encourage them to think critically about the world around them using Project Based Learning (PBL) methods.

For more information about Discovery Boxes from the International Museum of Cultures, please call us at 972 572-0462 or email us at info@internationalmuseumofcultures.org

Multi-Sensory learning at the Museum

Learning through discovery is a powerful form of learning. Often times a question is answered that was not asked creating knowledge beyond the expected. In addition, the result is often more questions and the pursuit of further understanding. Museums offer this valuable form of learning, discovery.

Museums are recognizing that there is even more that they can do. They can lengthen the retention of the knowledge learned. Retention can be extended through the use of multi-sensory learning.

The rhetorical question is asked in Trendswatch 2014, “Remember when you looked at a painting, listened to music, tasted your food, smelled
perfume and touched a (real, physical) object?” The human senses encourage memory retention. The report goes on to say “The demand for multisensory experiences is accelerated by discoveries documenting the utility as well as the artistic challenge and the sheer fun of engaging all the senses.”

The International Museum of Cultures (IMC) recognized the advantage of a multi-sensory experience quite a long time ago. The IMC has touch screen videos in select exhibits where the visitor can interact directly and choose to experience what the indigenous people see and hear. An example would be listening to the sound of a “Talking Drum“. The IMC also provides “Discovery Boxes” where the visitor can handle artifacts while following instructions that increase the engagement of the visitor with the daily lives of people living in far-away lands.

Discovery Boxes and the Electronic Field Trip are available for educational institutions to use at their locations. Engage the senses to encourage discovery and the retention of the information learned. For more information contact the International Museum of Cultures at 972-572-0462.Cultural context education

 

The Roles of Museums and Anthropology

The International Museum of Cultures (IMC) is an anthropology museum. This puts the IMC at the center of two role advancements, one that is occurring in the museum industry and the other that is affecting anthropological study.

Cultural context educationWithin the industry of museums, there is a tide change from the traditional passive contemplation role that was very popular through the majority of the last century and the modern role of the museum to be an active participant in community and education. In Anthropology, there is an increased emphasis to apply the findings discovered in the field to the present culture and economic environment of the observer.

Museum 2.0

Regarding the advancing role of the museum in society, Nina Simon posted Participation, Contemplation, and the Complexity of “and” in Museum 2.0 “To me, the backlash against participatory and community-centered experiences is not surprising. I’ve always understood that participatory experiences are not for everyone. I’ve always known that some people feel that social work means mission creep for museums. What surprises me is the argument that participatory and community-centered initiatives, offered alongside many other interpretative strategies, program types, and projects, can erode the value of an institution and the experiences it provides.”

Museums are continuing to increase their role in communities and education by expanding beyond their brick and mortar. Museums are bringing their experiential abilities to the attendee rather than having the attendee physically enter the museum.

Anthropology Advancing

The traditional methods of anthropological study have been to visit far away cultures, report on them and then return to report on the findings. Many of us laymen have fond memories of watching documentaries depicting people living, in our context, within strange and exotic cultures. Anthropology is advancing its role in applying the findings to our contemporary world and our local cultural and economic environment.

The challenge is the acceptance of the fact that all of our perspectives are filtered through our respective traditions and culture. The advanced Anthropological studies understand the human condition of the observer and properly shares the observations in the proper context.

In a post call A Major Value of the Anthropological Project (as I see it), agamwell writes “Sharing our stories with others too, can be helpful, as long as we are able to also understand views as partial, as one among many, and as long as we allow the space for multiple stories, even if contradictory, to exist at the same time. While each of us might not be able to change the world, we can at least change ourselves.”

So museums and Anthropology are moving to expand their roles and, consequently, expand our understanding of the world. The International Museum of Cultures is moving along in step by being a true partner in education. The IMC ships genuine artifacts to educational organizations with related curricular and also offers an electronic field trip delivered to any Web enabled device, also accompanied with related curricular. The purpose is to bring the cultures of the world to our students, in the context of and to improve the student’s world.

The Orville Rogers “Run for the Hills” Event is September 7, 2013

Trotter Capital Management

presents

Orville_Rogers_Run_Logo

Join the International Museum of Cultures for its 11th annual Orville Rogers Run for the Hills 5K Run/ 1.5 Mile walk on September 7, 2013 at 9 a.m. This year’s RUN will be held at Armstrong Park in Duncanville, TX. Please let us know if you are interested in being a volunteer for this event by Contacting Us.

Orville Rogers Run for the Hills

5K Run/ 1.5 Mile walk

September 7, 2013

9 a.m.

Armstrong Park

Duncanville, TX

 

RACE DAY REGISTRATION
Adult (over 18) – $20
Child (18 and under) – $15

Our Sponsors

The Suburban

Kamm and Associates

JSD Shirts

Jaynes Memorial Chapel

Najork Foundation

Merrywood School

Courtesy Car Care of Duncanville

 

Join the IMC for its annual Orville Rogers Run for the Hills – Sept 7, 2013

Orville_Rogers_Run_Logo

Join the International Museum of Cultures for its 11th annual Orville Rogers Run for the Hills 5K Run/ 1.5 Mile walk on September 7, 2013 at 9 a.m. This year’s RUN will be held at Armstrong Park in Duncanville, TX. Please let us know if you are interested in being a volunteer for this event by Contacting Us.

Orville Rogers Run for the Hills

5K Run/ 1.5 Mile walk

September 7, 2013

9 a.m.

Armstrong Park

Duncanville, TX

Click here to register

Early Registration(ends August 30):
Adult (over 18) – $15
Child (18 and under) – $10
Teams (5 or more) – $10/person

The IMC Works with the CHISD Arts Program

The International Museum of Cultures is honored to assist the Cedar Hill Independent School District in their engaging Elementary Arts Program.

Below is a video discussing the arts programs at two elementary schools in Cedar Hill, Texas, Waterford Oaks and Highlands Elementary, using Project Based Learning. The instructors immerse the students of these schools, which are from diverse backgrounds, in multi-cultural hands-on projects.

(The International Museum of Cultures is mentioned at 1:59 and 2:30 of the video)

As stated in the video above, Arts Programs are such an integral part of the educational puzzle. The spotlight is shown upon these great programs during National Arts in Education Week, September 9-15, 2012. Congress designated Arts in Education Week to promote and showcase the immense role arts education has in producing engaged, successful, and college and career-ready students.

The International Museum of Cultures always appreciates the opportunity to work with educational institutions to further enhance its mission to be a window on indigenous people of the world and to create greater appreciation for ethnic and cultural diversity, thereby furthering mutual respect and peace between peoples.

Anthroplogy Museum Supports Our Teachers Doing Project Based Learning

Project Based Learning

Project Based Learning (PBL,)  is a method of education that provides the student personal involvement in the learning process.

The student does not merely hear and read the information, but, actually takes part in the learning process with personal experience. The Student generally participates in PBL as a team member. The team can dynamically change the path of the process to obtain the expected result. Often, the expected result is beyond the original expectation because the students are free to spontaneously use their creativity. This freedom promotes the development of strategic problem solving that is greatly needed to perform well in this dynamic world.

Students at the Museum of Cultures Dallas Fort Worth Texas

The International Museum of Cultures has taken steps to assist our teachers by offering two educational tools below that fit well into the Project Based Learning model:

  • Discovery Boxes: Discovery boxes come in 12 different themes and include a variety of objects from our museum’s collection. Students will be able to touch and examine the objects while completing activities and worksheets that encourage them think critically about the world around them.
  • e-Field Trip: A Virtual Tour of the International Museum of Cultures that occurs without the need to travel to the museum. The videos come with related Curricula.

As Edutopia’s Page called “Project-Based Learning: A Short History” states: “…(John) Dewey challenged the traditional view of the student as a passive recipient of knowledge (and the teacher as the transmitter of a static body of facts). He argued instead for active experiences that prepare students for ongoing learning about a dynamic world. As Dewey pointed out, “Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself.”

For more information about the Discovery Boxes and Virtual Museum Tour provided by the International Museum of Cultures, contact us at (972) 708-7406.